PAD to the rhythm of tribal art

Artkhade

Paris, 25 March 2018

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From 4 to 8 April 2018, tribal art enthusiasts will be flocking to Paris Art Design!


At this 22nd edition of the fair, the French capital’s most talented galleries will be meeting up at the Jardin des Tuileries to celebrate creation and artistic taste. As is the case every year, the organisers have come up with a remarkable presentation of styles and eras, the guiding thread being prime aesthetics.


On the menu: modern art, contemporary design, furniture, jewellery… But also tribal art, with objects originating from Asia, America and Africa.


Among the French galleries that will be at the PAD this year, three are worth singling out. Galerie Lucas Ratton, specialised in ritual objects, is notably offering a Kuba bowl (Congo, 19th century) and a Pwo Tschokwe mask (Angola, 19th century).
Then, there’s Galerie Afrique, presenting African sculptures and ethnographic objects. This year, we can discover a superb and rare polychrome butterfly mask from the Bwa people of Burkina Faso. “This one was collected in 1975 in the [.../...]

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Tags: Oceanic Art, African Art, Asian Art, Native American Art, Fairs & Shows


TEFAF 2018: pleasing sales for Tribal Art

Artkhade

Maastricht, 23 March 2018

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From 10 to 18 March 2018, the 31st edition of TEFAF Maastricht, the international fair for fine art and antiquities, kept its promises for tribal art.

The fair, presenting 275 exhibitors this year, is one of the year’s biggest art events, and covers over 7,000 years of art history.

TEFAF Tribal – the latest section to be launched by the event’s organisers – was a great success, both among the public, and commercially, namely thanks to the presence of prestigious brands like Anthony Meyer (Paris) and Donald Ellis (New York).

Among the pleasing sales notched up, we can single out the wooden bowl in the form of a bird (c.1800), which went for 285,000 euros (Donald Ellis Gallery), or the fragment from a monumental bronze statue which found a new owner at 250,000 euros (Merrin Gallery).

“This new edition of TEFAF lived up to my expectations in a very positive way,” comments dealer Anthony Meyer. “I met enthusiastic new clients and touched base with a few old buyers. It seems to me that TEFAF’s tribal section has reached [.../...]

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Tags: Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Fairs & Shows


Respecting the Balance

Gilles Picard

Brussels, 23 January 2018

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Like most collectors flocking to BRAFA, Harold t’Kint de Roodenbeke likes the month of January. President of the fair for the sixth consecutive year, he reveals to Artkhade with AMA the key points of the strategy for the Brussels-based fair. Verbatim.

With nearly 25,000 artifacts and works of art, presented by 135 exhibitors, BRAFA is an event not to be missed. Considered one of the top five global art fairs, it takes place in January and is also the fair which sets the pace for the art market. Following the Paris biennale in September, Frieze Masters in October in London and shortly before the Maastricht TEFAF in March, BRAFA is a key date in the diary for all lovers of fine art. A major European event held at the stylish brick and wrought iron Tour & Taxis site, BRAFA signals the return to trading for the year. It is important to keep in mind that on this international stage whilst 30% of traders are Belgian, the bulk of those in attendance come from the other 15 countries represented, from Canada to Japan. The key characteristic of BRAFA [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Interviews, Fairs & Shows


The Dealers speak out

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 15 September 2017

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They’re the ones who murmur into the ears of collectors. Gallerists play a crucial role in the tribal-art economy. For this special issue, a number of them, each with their own specialities, have agreed to share their feelings on the sector. Confidences.

At auctions, the eclectic nature of the tribal-art market indicates sure growth in the long term, both in terms of the number of lots placed on sale and their proceeds, even if the last three years have seen heavy fluctuations, if not a slight decline. However, by overshadowing the reality of the world of dealers, auction results are only a partial indicator of the health of a sector characterised by deep restructuring. Between a generational shift among collectors, sourcing difficulties, and a complex balance between auction houses and dealers, what does the future hold?

Collectors: a new generation takes the reins? In the eyes of Alain Lecomte from the gallery Abla & Alain Lecomte, specialised in ancient African arts, there’s no doubt about it: the sector is in for a shakeup: “The [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, African Art, Fairs & Shows, Art Market


Alex Arthur, Tribal Art and its market

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 13 September 2017

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What are the evolutions and limitations of the tribal-art market? How is it nurtured by the contributions of research and ethnology? Alex Arthur offers us a few indications…

Alexander Arthur is a well-informed collector and a fine connoisseur of tribal arts. For over twenty years, he has been the publishing director of Tribal Art Magazine. In 2009, he also became involved, with Pierre Moos, in the management of Parcours des Mondes.

-You are one of the key protagonists of Parcours des Mondes. How have you seen the fair evolve?

A.A.: I actually participated in the very first Parcours so I remember well how it consisted of only a handful of galleries. But the concept was a good one and it grew rapidly into the world’s premier event. The event grew in quality as has the market overall and Parcours des Mondes has become the annual focal point for many galleries today, a situation that is reflected in the quality of many artworks on show and the number of thematic exhibitions.

-Tell us about vetting at the fair.

A.A.: Like [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Interviews, Fairs & Shows


To the sources of Tribal Art

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 12 September 2017

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As every year since 2001, the fair takes place in Saint-Germain-des-Prés for a week devoted to tribal art. Until 17 September, this gathering of 67 merchants offers a guaranteed change of scenery in the heart of Paris.

Parcours des Mondes, the fair steered by Pierre Moos – also managing director of Tribal Art magazine – has become the most important event in its field, leaping ahead of its most reputed European rivals. Incontestable success that confers on Parcours des Mondes its unique renown. No small feat, seeing how the schedule of events around classic African, Pacific, pre-Columbian and Asian arts, has taken off. Between the BRAFA and the BRUNEAF in Brussels, the TEFAF in Maastricht, the Tribal Art Fair in Amsterdam and London, and even Frieze New York which, this year, backed the decision to welcome tribal-art dealers in its alleys — Donald Ellis (New York, Vancouver), L & R Entwistle and Co (London) and Galerie Meyer (Paris) —, one thing is sure: we can no longer keep count of the number of international rendezvous organised in [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Fairs & Shows


4 Questions for Pierre Moos

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 12 September 2017

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-You have directed Parcours des Mondes since 2007. How do you view the evolution of the fair and of the tribal-art market?

P.M.: Parcours des Mondes was created in response to a demand from tribal-art dealers. As its name indicates, this fair is an international event, open to all forms of extra-European artistic cultures. For around ten years now, we’ve been working on our communication strategy for the event: we devote 80 % of Parcours des Mondes’ proceeds on expenses relating to press relations, advertising and marketing. This publicity, coupled with that associated to the auction sale of key pieces, helps to raise awareness on tribal art all over the world, and this is positive. Finally, the recent opening up of the fair to the Asian arts proves, if proof were still necessary, the major role of Paris on the global art market. All these elements explain why Parcours is the world’s most important fair in tribal art today… To give you an idea, some dealers who take part in the event produce, in just a few days, three quarters of [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Aboriginal Art, Fairs & Shows, Interviews


La Biennale Paris: The wind of renewal

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 3 September 2017

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A new formula for a historic fair. This year, La Biennale Paris is engaging in a rebirth that remains highly respectful of tradition. See it for yourself at the Grand Palais, until 17 September. The planet’s most elegant fair, riding on its heritage, opens up to new horizons.

“Confidence, confidence, confidence!” This could be – if one were needed – the motto of this 29th edition of the Biennale, formerly known as the Biennale des Antiquaires, currently on at the Grand Palais until 17 September… And it’s not Christopher “Kip” Forbes, chairman of this new opus, who will say the contrary. “La Biennale Paris is the most important fair in its field in France, and one of the most important in the world,” claims the American billionaire who, this year, succeds Henri Loyrette, former president of the Louvre. “I’ll try to keep up the level of excellence established by my eminent predecessors and I hope to contribute to making this edition of the Biennale the most brilliant one to ever exist.” The stakes have been set… Will [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Native American Art, Fairs & Shows


Bourgogne Tribal Show 2017

By Artkhade with Gus Adler & Filles

Besanceuil, 14 March 2017

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Jean-François Schmitt is an art-lover and collector. He is a Friend of the musée du Quai Branly – Jacques Chirac and a member of the Cercle Lévi-Strauss.

Anthony Meyer is a dealer, author, and specialist in Pacific and Eskimo ancient arts and traditional cultures. He manages the Meyer Gallery of Oceanic Arts in Paris and is one of the founders of the Bourgogne Tribal Show, along with Laurent Dodier, Bruno Frey, Jacques Lebrat and Bruno Mory.

For its second event, the Bourgogne Tribal Show will take place from 25th to 28th May, 2017. You both took part in the fair’s first event, one as a dealer, one as a collector. Could you share your experiences with us?

Jean-François Schmitt: My abiding memory of the first event is what a pleasure it was to see tribal art in less conventional settings. The atmosphere was very different from the other fairs, far more casual and convivial.

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Its location in the Burgundy region was ideal too, [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, Native American Art, Aboriginal Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Fairs & Shows, Exhibitions, Interviews


BRAFA, at the heart of the art market

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Brussels, 20 January 2017

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In Brussels this January, over four thousand years of art will be making their way to BRAFA. From archaeology to contemporary creation, this is not only a major European event, but a place to sound out the art market as a new year begins.

In January, after getting back from New Year’s Eve at Saint-Barthélemy, when nothing else seems to quite make the grade, not even a little omelette dotted with Alba white truffles, a quick dash to Brussels is just the thing! Why favour a Flemish destination, you might well ask? A yearning for the Belgian touch in the heart of winter? The timeless charm of the Place de Brouckère? Let’s put it this way: at the start of the year, the chicest rendezvous — one month after Art Basel on the coast of Florida in December, and shortly before the Armory Show in New York in March — is obviously BRAFA. Also known as the Brussels Art Fair, one of the oldest art and antiques fairs in the world. So much to say, the most stunning Brussels invention… just after the Délirium Café and its 3,000 beers.

**So let’s [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Fairs & Shows