Respecting the Balance

Gilles Picard

Brussels, 23 January 2018

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Like most collectors flocking to BRAFA, Harold t’Kint de Roodenbeke likes the month of January. President of the fair for the sixth consecutive year, he reveals to Artkhade with AMA the key points of the strategy for the Brussels-based fair. Verbatim.

With nearly 25,000 artifacts and works of art, presented by 135 exhibitors, BRAFA is an event not to be missed. Considered one of the top five global art fairs, it takes place in January and is also the fair which sets the pace for the art market. Following the Paris biennale in September, Frieze Masters in October in London and shortly before the Maastricht TEFAF in March, BRAFA is a key date in the diary for all lovers of fine art. A major European event held at the stylish brick and wrought iron Tour & Taxis site, BRAFA signals the return to trading for the year. It is important to keep in mind that on this international stage whilst 30% of traders are Belgian, the bulk of those in attendance come from the other 15 countries represented, from Canada to Japan. The key characteristic of BRAFA [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Interviews, Fairs & Shows


THE COLLECTIVE: Martine Pinard, a seeker of humanity

By Laurent Granier with Artkhade and Gus Adler & Filles

Paris, 23 January 2018

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Collectors and art lovers populate the world of ancient African, Oceanic and American arts. Laurent Granier takes a look at their backgrounds, the psychological mechanisms behind their passions, their doubts, and their strategies. With them, he discusses objects, their histories, and the market.

All self-respecting tribal-arts lovers are familiar with the blog Détours des mondes, its hundreds of meticulous posts, its accounts of exhibitions, its yays and its nays, and its thematic bibliographies. But who exactly is Martine Pinard, the author of the said blog, and the president of the eponymous association? I was dying to find out more about this discreet woman, whom I’d come across two or three times previously in the course of my research, and whose conscientious work gave me hope of a wonderful encounter. So we scheduled to meet for Sunday lunch in a venue that she is particularly fond of: La Maison Rouge, in Paris, on 2 April 2017.

Beautiful things

Born to a modest family, young Martine Pinard dreamed of conquering space. An only [.../...]

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Tags: Oceanic Art, African Art, Interviews


THE COLLECTIVE: Alexandre Logé, an unflagging hunter

By Laurent Granier with Artkhade and Gus Adler & Filles

Paris, 28 November 2017

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Collectors and art lovers populate the world of ancient African, Oceanic and American arts. Laurent Granier takes a look at their backgrounds, the psychological mechanisms behind their passions, their doubts, and their strategies. With them, he discusses objects, their histories, and the market.

Alexandre Logé, an unflagging hunter

Alexandre Logé gave up everything at the age of twenty-six to sail around the world: “A big romantic adventure, hitching a boat ride from Marseille to Brazil via Africa.” [The myth of French sailor Bernard Moitessier soon collapsed, but Alexandre reports a “loathing of parapraxes”.] He returned to Paris, penniless, after accomplishing his dream, “and above all with vast energy and an understanding that barriers are primarily mental.” In 2005 he set up his own business, “a micro-enterprise with a few bits of bronze and several ideas. Everything started off with three prototypes…” Today a designer and creator of acclaimed furniture, he works with galleries in New York, Paris, Brussels, and even [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Interviews


The Fondation Dapper opts for nomadism

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 20 November 2017

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The announcement of the Musée Dapper’s closure in May this year came as sad news. But the foundation suffers from no shortage of projects and intends to refocus on outside-the-walls initiatives. A meeting with its president, Christiane Falgayrettes-Leveau.

After thirty years of activity and around fifty exhibitions on its counter, the Musée Dapper closed its doors permanently on 18 June this year. In the face of dropping visitor numbers and overly high operational costs, this private museum, well known for its collection of around 6,000 pieces — including 2,000 ancient works from Africa, the Pacific and the Caribbean — was forced to shut. “Maintenance costs were too high, not to mention the cost of putting on exhibitions,” explains Christiane Falgayrettes-Leveau, president of the Fondation Dapper. “But the other reason, just as important, is that we wanted to renew ourselves.”

The Fondation Dapper, which Christiane Falgayrettes-Leveau set up in 1983 with her husband Michel Leveau, who died in 2012, took on a museum structure in [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Events, Interviews


THE COLLECTIVE: Olivier Salandini, instinctive yet rational

By Laurent Granier with Artkhade and Gus Adler & Filles

Paris, 6 octobre 2017

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The world of Ancient Arts from Africa, Oceania and America is populated by collectors and enthusiasts. Laurent Granier explores their personal journeys, their strategies, their uncertainties, and the driving forces behind their passion. Together, they discuss the objects, their stories, and the market that keeps them in motion.

Olivier Salandini, instinctive yet rational

Like any good musician who fine-tunes his repertoire, organist and harpsichordist Olivier Salandini lives surrounded by exquisitely selected works of art. And they transform him. The man who believes that “going to a museum is like going to a concert” met us to discuss his intimate relationship with African art objects, his favourite pieces, but also his approach to time and the Importance of continually developing his taste. Rendez-vous at the café Le Balto on Rue Mazarine, and at the Galerie Yann Ferrandin on Rue de Seine in Paris, on 1 April 2017.

Like living with someone

“How did I get started? Through antique stores. I’d buy here and there without [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Interviews


A new tribute to Jean Rouch

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 20 September 2017

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A prolific man, Jean Rouch directed more than 180 films. He was also well versed in poetry and ethnology. Today, several institutions are celebrating the centenary of his birth.

In 1957, Jean Rouch released Moi, un Noir, a film shot in pre-independence Cote d’Ivoire, which followed the daily lives of three Nigerian migrants. When the film came out, Jean-Luc Godard wrote three articles about the director and hailed him as the “free man” that he was: “the title on Jean Rouch’s calling card says it all: researcher for the Musée de l’Homme, the Museum of Man. Could a finer definition exist for the filmmaker?” Several years later, in 1960, Godard even contemplated titling his first feature film Moi, un Blanc — which posterity would come to know as À bout de souffle.

Going back to Rouch, this filmmaker discovered Niger at the age of twenty-five, and fervently explored its capital, Niamey, before pushing the doors of Africa open wider. As a connoisseur of the continent, this “free man” produced work that stands out for its [.../...]

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Tags: Oceanic Art, African Art, Events


The Dealers speak out

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 15 September 2017

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They’re the ones who murmur into the ears of collectors. Gallerists play a crucial role in the tribal-art economy. For this special issue, a number of them, each with their own specialities, have agreed to share their feelings on the sector. Confidences.

At auctions, the eclectic nature of the tribal-art market indicates sure growth in the long term, both in terms of the number of lots placed on sale and their proceeds, even if the last three years have seen heavy fluctuations, if not a slight decline. However, by overshadowing the reality of the world of dealers, auction results are only a partial indicator of the health of a sector characterised by deep restructuring. Between a generational shift among collectors, sourcing difficulties, and a complex balance between auction houses and dealers, what does the future hold?

Collectors: a new generation takes the reins? In the eyes of Alain Lecomte from the gallery Abla & Alain Lecomte, specialised in ancient African arts, there’s no doubt about it: the sector is in for a shakeup: “The [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, African Art, Fairs & Shows, Art Market


Alex Arthur, Tribal Art and its market

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 13 September 2017

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What are the evolutions and limitations of the tribal-art market? How is it nurtured by the contributions of research and ethnology? Alex Arthur offers us a few indications…

Alexander Arthur is a well-informed collector and a fine connoisseur of tribal arts. For over twenty years, he has been the publishing director of Tribal Art Magazine. In 2009, he also became involved, with Pierre Moos, in the management of Parcours des Mondes.

-You are one of the key protagonists of Parcours des Mondes. How have you seen the fair evolve?

A.A.: I actually participated in the very first Parcours so I remember well how it consisted of only a handful of galleries. But the concept was a good one and it grew rapidly into the world’s premier event. The event grew in quality as has the market overall and Parcours des Mondes has become the annual focal point for many galleries today, a situation that is reflected in the quality of many artworks on show and the number of thematic exhibitions.

-Tell us about vetting at the fair.

A.A.: Like [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Interviews, Fairs & Shows


To the sources of Tribal Art

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 12 September 2017

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As every year since 2001, the fair takes place in Saint-Germain-des-Prés for a week devoted to tribal art. Until 17 September, this gathering of 67 merchants offers a guaranteed change of scenery in the heart of Paris.

Parcours des Mondes, the fair steered by Pierre Moos – also managing director of Tribal Art magazine – has become the most important event in its field, leaping ahead of its most reputed European rivals. Incontestable success that confers on Parcours des Mondes its unique renown. No small feat, seeing how the schedule of events around classic African, Pacific, pre-Columbian and Asian arts, has taken off. Between the BRAFA and the BRUNEAF in Brussels, the TEFAF in Maastricht, the Tribal Art Fair in Amsterdam and London, and even Frieze New York which, this year, backed the decision to welcome tribal-art dealers in its alleys — Donald Ellis (New York, Vancouver), L & R Entwistle and Co (London) and Galerie Meyer (Paris) —, one thing is sure: we can no longer keep count of the number of international rendezvous organised in [.../...]

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Tags: Aboriginal Art, Native American Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Asian Art, Oceanic Art, African Art, Fairs & Shows


4 Questions for Pierre Moos

By Artkhade with Art Media Agency

Paris, 12 September 2017

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-You have directed Parcours des Mondes since 2007. How do you view the evolution of the fair and of the tribal-art market?

P.M.: Parcours des Mondes was created in response to a demand from tribal-art dealers. As its name indicates, this fair is an international event, open to all forms of extra-European artistic cultures. For around ten years now, we’ve been working on our communication strategy for the event: we devote 80 % of Parcours des Mondes’ proceeds on expenses relating to press relations, advertising and marketing. This publicity, coupled with that associated to the auction sale of key pieces, helps to raise awareness on tribal art all over the world, and this is positive. Finally, the recent opening up of the fair to the Asian arts proves, if proof were still necessary, the major role of Paris on the global art market. All these elements explain why Parcours is the world’s most important fair in tribal art today… To give you an idea, some dealers who take part in the event produce, in just a few days, three quarters of [.../...]

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Tags: African Art, Oceanic Art, Asian Art, Pre-Columbian Art, Native American Art, Aboriginal Art, Fairs & Shows, Interviews